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MITCHELL * BROUGHALL * TRAVISS * HARGRAFT
OBITUARIES

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BROUGHALL, Lewis William George [1862-1927] source unknown, date unknown

George Broughall - Had Active Career - In Winnipeg During Land Boom and Served in N.W. Rebellion -

Mr. George Broughall died yesterday afternoon at his residence 67 Lowther Ave, after a long illness which he bore with the greatest courage.  Until recently he felt quite confident of recovery and frequently referred to what he would do when he went out again.  Cheerfulness and optimism were characteristic of him during his varied career.  He was born in Port Hope, Ont., on April 2, 1862 and after leaving high school he went to Chicago were for a time he was a reporter on the Tribune.  In 1881he reached Winnipeg and became a reporter on the Manitoba Free Press.  Those were the days of the first land boom and among the promotions to devised for the purposes of securing the government land grant was the Portage. Westbourne and Gladstone Railway, of which he was appointed paymaster.  Great difficulties were experienced and financing the enterprise, a riot took place among the laborers in Portage la Prairie and railway offices were demolished.  The promoters failed ot get the land grand and the road eventually passed into the hands of the C.P.R.  Mr. Broughall resigned to take the position of Secretary in the Attorney-General's department under the Norquay administration.  He was one of the organizers of the 90th Rifles, was a sergeant at the drill and served with them in the North-West Rebellion.  He was the author of two plays given by the boys of the battalion, one of them, the "90th on Active Service" which brought to the notice of the Winnipeg people the well-known name of "Little Black Devils".  The other was as musical burlesque.  "The Tricky Troubadour", which cleared a large sum of money for the battalion.  But it happened to include some jokes at the expense of the opposition.  Shortly afterward the Greenway Government came into power and Hon. Joseph Martin decided that economy demanded the abolition of the office of secretary.  He then became interested in real estate in the West and at one time owned nearly 200,000 acres of which he retained possession of about 7000 acres near Saskatoon.  In 1891 he accepted the position of manager for Eastern Canada of the Equitable Life Insurance Company of New York, with headquarters at Toronto, but retired from active business about fifteen years ago.  Mr. Broughall always took the great interest in sports, particularly figure skating and bicycling.  He was one of the originators of the old Winnipeg Bicycle Club and after retiring from business made figure skating a "hobby".  When the Toronto Skating Club was reorganized after the war he became a member, but was soon convinced that figure skaters to make any progress must have an artificial ice rink of their own.  Having investigated rinks and plants in the leading cities of the United States, he presented a plan to the Toronto Skating Club which was ultimately adopted.  The Toronto Winter Club Limited, was formed with Mr. Broughall as managing director to construct the new building on Dupont Street and the Toronto Skating Club at one leaped into fame as the largest and best institution of the kind in the world.  It owes its unrivalled position to his geniality, foresight and financial ability and in recognition of his services he  was made an honorary life member.  He was also a member of the Summit Golf Club.  In religion he was Anglican, member of saint Paul's church.  He leaves a widow, one son and one daughter.

Unknown source and date:

George Broughall has had a varied career.  After leading Port Hope School, he went to Chicago as a reporter on the Tribune, and then to Winnipeg on the Free Press.  He introduced the first typewriter used in Winnipeg (a caligraph. "about the size of a grain elevator"), and he brought in the first bicycle, a high wheeler; and took a trip alone over the western trails before railroads were constructed, traveling beyond the second crossing of the Souris River, astonishing than native half-breeds and Indians.  Mr. Broughall was appointed paymaster on the old Portage, Westbourne and Gladstone Railway, now branch of the C.P.R., afterwards becoming secretary to the Attorney-General of Manitoba.  While in Winnipeg he helped to form the 90th Rifles and served in the North-West Rebellion where the regiment acquired its present name of the "little black devils".  Mr. Broughall operated in real estate, at one time owning 200,000 acres of land.  He came to Toronto to take the Eastern management of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, since then retiring.  As a hobby he has always been interested in figure skating, and it was due to his idea that the present Dupont street rink was started.  He worked for two years trying to persuade people that a rink piped to an ice cream plant would be a success.  He talked the head off everybody claiming that the Toronto Skating Club could never be a success until they owned a rink.  a meeting was called, where he explained his plans, committees were appointed, and the success was due to the enthusiastic support of all interested.  As a result the club is now the largest skating organization in the world with a membership of over 1,300, financially it is a wonder.  The club is now quoted throughout Europe , Australia and America.  The club made Mr. Broughall a life member.  The success of the marvelous annual carnivals could never have been attained without the facilities afforded by this rink.  Mr. Broughall now devotes his winter time as secretary for the club, and his summers to trying vainly to correct a slice in golf.  

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MITCHELL, William James  [1843-1907]

The death of Mr. W. J. Mitchell occurred at his late residence, 96 St. George St, on Tuesday morning, the 29th of October, 1907.  Mr. Mitchell has been for many years a wholesale and retail druggist in Winnipeg, starting there in 1882, one of the Western pioneers in the business.  He was formerly connected with the firm of Hooper & Com., Toronto.  During the past ten years he has had his residence in Toronto.  Mr. Mitchell took an active interest in travel, and was an ardent sportsman.  He was one of the charter members of the Tadenae Club.  Georgian Bay, a member of the Albany and Victoria Clubs, Toronto.  In religion he was an Anglican, being a member of St. Stephen's Church, Toronto.  Mr. Mitchell was a widower, his wife having died three years ago.  The surviving members of his family are: Mrs. George Broughall, of this city;  Mr. Harry Mitchell of Winnipeg, and Mr. E. H. Mitchell of Victoria, B.C.  He is also survived by his mother, Mrs. Emma Mitchell, of 62 Alexander St., and four sisters, Mrs. Sarah Wilson, Mrs. Alex Dixon, Miss Mitchell and Mrs. P.L. Mason, and two brothers, the Rev. George A. Mitchell and H.E. Mitchell

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Rev: 2003.12.08