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HISTORY OF BANDON

Definitions

   
Act of Uniformity 1663 Henry VIII's committed Protestant daughter Elizabeth introduces through Parliament in 1559 (Act of Uniformity, Act of Supremacy) a Church of England with clear Reformation doctrinesThe Act of Uniformity of 1662 required that "every parson, vicar or other minister whatsoever" should, before the Feast of St. Bartholomew, "openly and publicly before the congregation assembled for religious worship, declare his unfeigned assent and consent to all and everything contained in, and prescribed by, the Book  of Common Prayer." It further enacted that "no person should be capable of any benefice, or presume to consecrate or administer the Holy Sacrament, before he ordained a Priest by Episcopal ordination". All ministers who did not comply with the requirements of the Act were deprived of their livings, and if they officiated in any Church, they were subject to fines and imprisonment.
Assize  
Banshee or 'Bean-sidhe' is Irish for fairy woman. Her sharp, cries and wails are also called 'keening'. The English word 'Keen' is from the Irish 'Caoineadh' meaning lament.         http://members.tripod.com/~pg4anna/Ban.htm
Board of First Fruits Apparently, a newly ordained clergyman was obliged to donate his first year's income to a fund for the maintenance of churches. This fund was administered by the Board of First Fruits. In the late 18th and early 19th century, many of the Church of Ireland churches standing today were built with money donated from this fund.
   
Borlace In 1640, Sir John Borlace was appointed Lord Justices for the government of Ireland
bote,  fire, bote was wood granted by a lord to his tenants for use as fuel.
Burgesses  
Cadmean alphabet of sixteen letters;  Cad*me"an (?), a. [L. Cadmeus, Gr. , from (L. Cadmus), which name perhaps means lit. a man from the East; cf. Heb. qedem east.] Of or pertaining to Cadmus, a fabulous prince of Thebes, who was said to have introduced into Greece the sixteen simple letters of the alphabet --  α, β, c, δ, ε, ι, κ, λ, μ, ν, ο, π, ρ, σ, τ, &upsilon.
Calvinism a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought, articulated by John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century
carrows  
carthlaghs  
   
Celtic http://member.rivernet.com.au/manxman/Celts/historycelts.htm
chirurgeons from the Greek cheirourgia meaning "hand work
Commonalty  
Common Pleas The main court for cases between individuals about land and debt rather than prosecutions by the crown
Con of the hundred fights  
Copyholder a holder of land, granted to him by the lord of a manor. The copy referred to a list drawn up on behalf of the lord of the manor. The manor system of land ownership was a medieval English contrivance that the Elizabethan planters appear to have attempted to introduce to their settlements in Ireland.
cordwainer English term meaning shoemaker.
carucate
(see ploughland)
A plowland; as much land as one team can plow in a year and a day; -- by some said to be about 100 acres.
Episcopalian from medieval Latin ecclesia Anglicana meaning 'the English church;  Anglican, Church of England
gallow-glasses Galloglaich (foreign soldiers) were later known as Gallow Glasses. They were involved in the "settlement" of  Ireland in the 1600's, and many blended into the Irish people.
gneeve An Irish land measure of approximately 30 acres, although I have seen it defined as between 30 and 50 acres. Possibly to do with tillage rather than pasture land. Its origin is an Irish word whose meaning I can't remember at the moment. Sometimes, as with ploughland, used as a description of an area of land rather than a measure of its area.
Geraldines the House of FitzGerald, an old noble Norman family that had become gaelicised over the centuries since the original Norman invasion of the 12th century. By the 16th century, they were rebelling against the English.
halbert a halbert is a pole type weapon which has both spear and axe together. With this form, both axe's slashing and spear's thrusting can be seasoned.
hereditaments things that can be inherited
herriott  
hustings the platform which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election. was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.
   
messuages gardens, plantations, etc.
ophthalmia A rare, bilateral granulomatous uveitis, associated with either a perforating eye injury in the region of the ciliary body or a retained foreign body in the eye. The exact cause is unknown, but it is believed to be related to sensitivity (i.e., a reaction) to uveal pigment. It has been known to follow uncomplicated intraocular surgery for cataracts or glaucoma. The injured eye becomes inflamed first, and the other eye follows (i.e., "sympathetically"). Symptoms include photophobia, redness, and blurred vision; in some cases, there are also "floaters" and possibly pain. The history of trauma differentiates this condition from other types of granulomatous uveitis; other differentiating factors include its bilateral, diffuse, and acute nature.
Pale The descendants of the most powerful Anglo-Norman settlers in Ireland gradually became identified with the native Irish, whose language, habits, and laws they adopted to an increasing extent. To counteract this, the Anglo-Irish Parliament passed, in 1366, the Statute of Kilkenny, decreeing excommunication and heavy penalties against all those who followed the custom of, or allied themselves with, the native Irish. This statute, however, remained inoperative; and although Richard II, king of England, later in the 14th century made expeditions into Ireland with large forces, he failed to achieve any practical result. The power and influence of the natives increased so much at the time of the War of the Roses that the authority of the English crown became limited to the area known as the English Pale, a small coastal district around Dublin and the port of Drogheda. In the War of the Roses, the struggle in England between the houses of York and Lancaster, Ireland supported the losing house of York.
   
Penal Laws

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http://www.law.umn.edu/irishlaw/index.html   From the consolidation of English power in 1691 until well into the nineteenth century, religion was the gulf which divided the colonial rulers of Ireland from the native majority. This sectarian division resulted from deliberate government policy. It reached into political, economic, and personal life, through a series of statutes known as the Penal Laws. This site contains the texts of these laws.
   
Petronels Mounted hand-gunners.
   
   
Pottle of sack A pot or drinking vessel with a capacity of 2.0 quarts (1.9 liters).
Protestants A break-away section of the Christian faith which started when Marin Luther, on 31 Oct., 1517, posted his 95 theses or PROTESTS on the University Castle Church Door at  Witternberg. http://www.kcweb.net/~matthewfox/Luther.html
Protestantism became the religion of England with Henry VIII.
Provost or Portrief  
Puritan originally members of a group of English Protestants seeking "purity"
Ploughland
(see carucate
a measure of land area of approximately 100 acres. It was originally based on the amount of land that one man could till in a season using one team of oxen. The measure consisted of about 80 acres to be tilled and 20 acres to supply grass to feed the animals. However, I think that in some instances, the word ploughland was used with a more imprecise meaning, merely referring to an expanse of (possibly tillage) farm land with no particular acreage implied
Oath of Supremacy

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http://www.law.umn.edu/irishlaw/index.html     1A. B., do utterly testify and declare in my conscience, that the Queen's highness is the only supreme governor of this realm, and of all other her Highness dominions and countries, as well in all spiritual or ecclesiastical things or causes, as temporal, and that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state or potentate, hath, or ought to have any jurisdiction, power, superiority, preheminence, or authority ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm; and therefore I do utterly renounce and forsake all foreign jurisdictions, powers, superiorities, and authorities, and do promise that from henceforth I shall bear faith and true allegiance to the Queen's Highness, her heirs and lawful successors, and to my power shall assist and defend all jurisdictions, preheminences, privileges and authorities granted or belonging to the Queen's Highness, her heirs and successors, or united and annexed to the imperial crown of this realm. So help me God, and by the contents of this book.'
 
Rapparees guerrilla bands of kerns known as Rapparees (Raparees) in 1680's.
Not regular soldiers but operated in groups and employed speed and agility as cavalry units and sometimes as foot soldiers
Reformed Church a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Calvinist system of doctrine
   
Roman Catholic http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/  RC Encyclopedia
Sassenach Irish word for the English   The name 'Sassenach' is believed to be the Scots name for the English. However, this was not originally the case. Way back in the mist of time it was a name the Highland Scots gave to anyone coming from south of the Highland Line starting around Stirling where the Angles and Frisians has conquered. The name Sassenach actually refers to the Saxons. It is reported that the Picts, the original inhabitants of Caledonia [today's Scotland} defeated the Angles and Frisians in 685, but it is not known how decisive that victory was.
Saxon http://www.british-israel.ca/usa22.htm
Seigniories In the early 17th century, land was divided into concessions, called seigniories, granted to noblemen. The noblemen then conceded part of their land, divided into lots, to the plantees.
Sugan Pronounced 'soogawn', is an Irish word for a rope made from straw.
Tenements buildings,
Tory
Usquebaugh Irish & Scots Whiskey.
Widgeon a bird, of the duck family
Woodkerns armed Irish peasants who lurked in the forest, bursting in upon and slaughtering the inhabitants at will.  Kern: lightly armed Irish skirmishers, who usually carried a missile weapon or firearm.
Yeoman generally it means a freeholder of a lower status than gentleman who cultivates his own land.

[Back]

 [Preface]    [Contents]    [Bernards]   [Index]    [Depositions]    [Maps]   [Definitions]    [Town/Parish Descriptions, 1835]  [Pictures]

Chapters

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25